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Higher Order Thinking: Changing perspective

You may have heard of the Kaplan model and possibly used it in the classroom so in this blog today I am going to outline a way I have easily used ‘Multiple perspectives’

Multiple Perspectives encourages students to think about a topic from various, specific points of view. This aspect of the Kaplan model adds complexity by asking students to look widely at how others may see a topic/question/issue rather than just depending their knowledge in one particular area.

In this task I asked a group of Year 2 students to show me the books they like to borrow from the library. After an enthusastic discussion we then looked at the front cover of these books and compared the types of books the boys and then the girls had borrowed.

We discovered that there were certain covers that boys would never borrow as was the same for girls.

So it was time to encourage the thinking tool of multiple perspectives.

Each child was asked to take home a book that they would have never picked up before – think a Rainbow Magic fairy book for a boy and a Zac Power for a girl – both covers are very stereotypical female/male.

At first all of the students protested and begrudgingly placed them in their bags but after a week there were some great responses:

  • Some enjoyed the experience and actually enjoyed the books
  • Others had better insight into why boys/girls read these types of books and why
  • Discussion of how the publishers play a huge role in what we borrow
  • Many would read that book series again
  • Insight into what stereotypically boys and girls like to read as the discussion was together so children were able to discuss why they like these types of books.

Overall this was an excellent literacy activity to view writing and books from different perspectives, step outside of comfort zones and of course to have a robust and meaningful conversation.

Let me know if you give this a go!

Gifted Education, literacy

Adding Depth and Complexity to your writing program

Asking open ended questions-2

Many teachers often look at this concept and worry that they will have to overhaul their whole program to make this happen – but never fear! You do not!

As you peruse over the writing program you have, consider how:

  •  You can vary the types of text you expose the students to according to their talents and needs.
  •  Make the lessons link to real life
  •  Group students so they can work with like minded peers
  • Make time so that they are supported by the teacher on a regular basis, not just left for independent work because they are more able.

I have included some further explanation below with examples and ideas. As always, if you are keen for further support please do not hesitate to get in touch.

Vanessaryanrendall@gmail.com

Expose students to more texts of different complexity, different topics and different formats.

  • Look for patterns within these different texts. Explore how they are engaging, how the language assists the text.
  • Compare the voice of the authors.
  • Critique these – do they really convince you? Engage you?
  • Find what students like about the different texts and how they can use some of the language to improve their writing.

Peer mentoring

  • Work with like minded students to read over each other’s work.

Teacher mentoring

  • Set aside time to support your bright and gifted students to work through raising the bar in their writings

Make it real

  • Find a way to make this text type real. What sort of audience could the students write for?
  • Narrative – writing competition, school newsletter, convert into a performance or picture book
  • Exposition/Discussion – send the letter to local MP, council, PM, class debate
  • Poetry – writing competitions, slam poetry competition in school, newsletter, christmas card insert 
  • Information report – write and then change into a documentary, present to class or leadership, assembly, school newsletter.
  • Explanation – Create a documentary, present to class
  • Recount – Artwork could be created from this and displayed
  • Review – create a blog where books/products are regularly reviewed by the class. 

Give structure so they understand what is expected. 

  • Gifted and bright students still need to understand how they set out different text types but offer them more advanced options through extra paragraphs, comparisons within their text, catchy starts and finishes through rhetorical questions etc.
  • Word banks that are at their stage level and then at their ability level.
  • Brainstorm various themes they could write about
Gifted Education, Parenting, teaching

Mathematics and Gifted Education

little girl with clock

Many educators and parents are often quick to jump onto online games, free worksheets and you tube tutorials to help support mathematics.

But what about gifted students?

At times, most gifted students do need support from a teacher  in the classroom – even if it is a quick five minute lesson.

But do they need online games at harder levels or harder worksheets as homework or as a fast finisher activity?

The answer is mostly, no.

Any gifted mathematician, once they understand the topic or new skill only need a small amount of drill and practice to master and from there it is up to the educators to give them tasks that allow them to use this new knowledge.

This can be done through

– Problem Solving

– Real world tasks

– Projects that embed the new skill/s

Some examples that I have used in the classroom and online

  1. Measurement: Stage 3 – Length, Area and Perimeter

My group of students had understood how to measure length, perimeter and area and from this were given the task of finding these dimensions in their own bedroom BUT – Let’s add challenge by increasing the parameters: I gave them the task to design their own tiny house. These houses have a set area of 40m2. They also had to use furniture that they had to buy from a particular homewares shop. So not only are they using their knowledge, they are also problem solving with a real world task. The students had fun and enjoyed the challenge. https://aussietinyhouses.com.au/tiny-houses/casuarina-84/

2.  Measurement – Time – Stage 2

This group of students understood how to tell the time on an analog clock. The main class were given the task of making their own clock to use the learnt skills but this group were asked to design a clock or a set of clocks that would help people to know what the time was in other countries. From here they had to decide the best time for the people in the different countries to call each other. Another additional activity is to challenge these students with elapsed time such as I started lunch at 1:27pm and ate for 1 hour and 17 minutes. What time did I finish?

There is no excuse for extra worksheets – problem solving and real world activities are the answer.

If you would like me to support you at your school or as a parent need support to talk to your school, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Vanessa

Creativity, Gifted Education, literacy, teaching

A literacy lesson and more on Myths from different cultures…

In Year 3 this term I am embarking on teaching students about myths from different cultures and times.

This week we started on what a myth is and how to tell the difference between a myth, legend, folktale and fairytale.

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But what made this lesson higher order is what we did next.

Choose a natural phenomenon and find as many myths as you can about that phenomenon

Myths about the Sun

 

Key Questions using the KAPLAN Model for Depth and complexity

 

  • BIG IDEAS- What are the big ideas behind the telling of this myth?
  • PATTERNS – Are there similar patterns throughout the different myths?
  • UNANSWERED QUESTIONS – What was the characters motive? What was the purpose of the sun before this myth? Why was this myth created?
  • CHANGES OVER TIME – Has the myth changed over time? How are our viewpoints of this natural phenomenon influenced today?

 

Have you taught myths in your classroom? I would love to know what you have done!

Click to access Kaplan-Depth-and-Complexity-1y4xdgk.pdf