Gifted Education, Parenting, teaching

Being Gifted is not how well a child does at school, it is who they are.

Are you confused with the label of Giftedness?

Perhaps you have heard it being used too often or not at all?

For someone to be labelled as Gifted they are functioning at a higher level in their field of talent than the majority of the population.

That field can be:

Academic/Intellectual

Creative

Socio/Effective

Muscular/Physical

They have these gifts before they head to school in some form or another. These gifts need to be nurtured at home and in the classroom if they are to develop into talents.

 

 

 

So in looking at this, schools cannot make students Gifted.

They can however help students realise their gifts, they can challenge them and enrich their learning.

Parents are the key links to informing the school about their child and the gifts they display at home.

Teachers are the key to identifying the children in their classroom so they know how to challenge and support each gifted child to develop their gift into a talent.

How does your school identify and support gifted students?

 

 

Gifted Education, Parenting, teaching

Building resilient learners

Without considering learning difficulties or underachievement, many gifted students cruise through their schooling years.

I come across many gifted students who just cannot cope with a challenging task – although they are gifted, have tested highly or are anecdotal extremely able.

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They cry, they misbehave, they say ‘I’m hopeless’ at the drop of a challenging hat.

Although school is fun, there are friends and great activities – School is easy. There is little challenge.

And this poses a problem.

These children NEED to be challenged on a daily basis and many schools are doing these students a disservice by always giving them work they can achieve easily.

Without challenge, students never feel a sense of failure.

Without challenge, students do not need to change their way of thinking.

Without challenge, students do not need to build resilience

Without challenge, students do not know how to problem solve. 

Every teacher, in every classroom needs to set the bar just that bit higher. They need to pre test students to understand what they know so they can give them learning opportunities where they will be challenged.

When students are challenged they may fail, but they can work out solutions to fix that problem.

When students are challenged they understand how to deal with mistakes and failure and build up resilience.

When students are challenged they feel a better sense of achievement. 

It is too often I teach gifted students who get easily upset in pullout programs or misbehave because they are being challenged. They do not know how to stretch themselves or deal with mistakes.

Teachers of every grade need to constantly challenge their students in some way so that they grow every day and become stronger believers in their own abilities.

Visit my facebook page for some great discussions and ways that I can help you as a parent or teacher to challenge these students with my online or face to face course.

Educate Empower Gifted: https://www.facebook.com/groups/293988788179957/

 

Creativity, Gifted Education, literacy, teaching

A literacy lesson and more on Myths from different cultures…

In Year 3 this term I am embarking on teaching students about myths from different cultures and times.

This week we started on what a myth is and how to tell the difference between a myth, legend, folktale and fairytale.

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But what made this lesson higher order is what we did next.

Choose a natural phenomenon and find as many myths as you can about that phenomenon

Myths about the Sun

 

Key Questions using the KAPLAN Model for Depth and complexity

 

  • BIG IDEAS- What are the big ideas behind the telling of this myth?
  • PATTERNS – Are there similar patterns throughout the different myths?
  • UNANSWERED QUESTIONS – What was the characters motive? What was the purpose of the sun before this myth? Why was this myth created?
  • CHANGES OVER TIME – Has the myth changed over time? How are our viewpoints of this natural phenomenon influenced today?

 

Have you taught myths in your classroom? I would love to know what you have done!

Click to access Kaplan-Depth-and-Complexity-1y4xdgk.pdf

 

Gifted Education

Enriching a literacy lesson – character

As a teacher of gifted students in a pullout group setting that focuses in literacy I am always trying out new ways to extend and enrich these students.

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This week, in Year One, we looked at characters. The scene was set – we had just invented a machine that could travel inside books to meet different characters.

  1. Students were asked to think of as many characters from books as they could (noting books not movies)
  2. We then classified these characters as being either from the Past, Present, our world or other worlds. Some characters fitted in more than one quadrant. Students needed to justify why the character was placed where it had been.
  3. Once we did this, students chose a character from each quadrant that they would like to meet.
  4. I then introduced Gardner’s multiple intelligences in a simplistic way to show students all of the different ways someone can be smart.
  5. Students then worked out how their character showed different types of intelligences throughout their story with examples from the book.

 

This is a great way to look differently at character analysis and also helps students to see that being smart isn’t just about academia, it can be about so much more than that.

Let me know if you get to share this lesson in your classroom!

Gifted Education

Ways that schools help and hinder Gifted students.

The justification for gifted education is simple: Academically advanced children should be given work at their speed and level, both to nurture their talents and prevent them from becoming bored and disruptive in class.

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I came across an interesting article this week: 4 ways schools help  or hinder Giftedness

This does make links to schooling in America but I believe there are links to Australia too.

Slow growth – it is often found in many schools that students who score highly in NAPLAN (albeit controversial testing) often do not show growth. How can we ensure that high achievers continue to achieve? There are many ways we can do this but change may be needed within the classroom – pull out groups, grouping within the classroom, acceleration, project based activities are just a few ideas.

Identification – are we using the appropriate identification tools for the students in our schools? Do you consider if you have students from a non-english speaking background? Indigenous background? Born overseas? Refugee? Each school needs to consider how they use standardised testing BUT they also need to consider how well teachers are equipped to create high quality pre assessments to gather data as well as good observation skills so they can pick up underachievers and 2e students (Twice exceptional)

Advanced curriculum – How well do we cater for gifted students in the classroom? Do we extend or enrich their learning? Teachers need to consider if they just need to be stretched sideways (problem solving, critical thinking within the current grade outcomes) or advanced to harder content (acceleration through stages). Many Gifted students will benefit from a combination of both but many do not receive this in the mainstream classroom. Teachers do need support for this to happen.

Tailor to students interests – It is really important that with Gifted students – and with other students also, that we tailor to their interests as much as possible. Think about how a lesson can be taught that catches students attention so not only are they excited about learning, they can use the great skills they have to build on skills in other areas. A students who is talented in mathematics can be extended in other ways – not always just in mathematics. They have the reasoning skills and the problem solving skills that may help them to solve environmental issues, humanitarian crisis or just something as simple as an issue in how the school timetable flows.